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346 Gordon Palmer Hall

October 2014

Colloquium – Dr. Chiu-Yen Kao, Claremont McKenna College

October 2, 2014 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Shape Optimization Problems Involving Eigenvalues and Their Applications Since Lord Rayleigh conjectured that the disk should minimize the first Laplace-Dirichlet eigenvalue among all shapes of equal area more than a century ago, eigenvalue optimization problems have been active research topics with applications in various areas including mechanical vibration, electromagnetic cavities, photonic crystals, and population dynamics. In this talk, we will review some interesting classical problems and discuss some recent developments.

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February 2015

Colloquium – Ming Yan, University of California, Los Angeles

February 4, 2015 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Parallel and distributed optimization Abstract: Due to the explosion in size and complexity of modern datasets, both the decentralized collection or storage of these datasets as well as accompanying parallel and distributed solution methods are either necessary or at least highly desirable. In this talk, I will introduce several ways to move from single threaded optimization algorithms to parallel and distributed approaches with examples: direct parallel and distributed implementation, reformulation of the problem, and new algorithms suitable for parallel and…

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December 2015

Putnam Mathematical Competition

December 5, 2015 @ 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Free

The William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition is an annual math competition for undergraduate students enrolled at institutions of higher learning in the United States and Canada. The competition was founded by Elizabeth Lowell Putnam in memory of her husband William Lowell Putnam, who was an advocate of intercollegiate intellectual competition. The exam has been offered annually since 1938 and is administered by the Mathematical Association of America.

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April 2017

Dissertation Defense – Xin Luo

April 26, 2017 @ 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm
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May 2017

Applied Math Seminar – Shibin Dai

May 26, 2017 @ 11:00 am

Phase-Field Free Energy and Boundary Force for Molecular Solvation Abstract: We discuss a phase-filed variational model for the solvation of charged molecules with implicit solvent. The solvation free-energy functional of all phase fields consists of the surface energy, solute excluded volume and solute-solvent van der Waals dispersion energy, and electrostatic free energy. The last part is defined through the electrostatic potential governed by the Poisson-Boltzmann equation in which the dielectric coefficient is defined through a phase field. We prove Gamma-…

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September 2017

Join the Association of Women in Mathematics Student Chapter

September 25, 2017 @ 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm

Come join us for the start of the AWM Student Chapter at the University of Alabama! Free food! CONNECT with and LEARN from female mathematicians! Free membership to AWM (plus a newsletter subscription)! Who can join? Undergraduate & Graduate Students Faculty Men & Women All Majors

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October 2017

Colloquium – Zhimin Zhang, Wayne State University

October 11, 2017 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Topic:  Polynomial Preserving Recovery for Gradient and Hessian Abstract:  Post-processing techniques are important in scientific and engineering computation. One of such technique, Superconvergent Patch Recovery (SPR) proposed by Zienkiewicz-Zhu in 1992, has been widely used in finite element commercial software packages such as Abaqus, ANSYS, Diffpack, etc.; another one, Polynomial Preserving Recovery (PPR) has been adopted by COMSOL Multiphysics since 2008. In this talk, I will give a survey for the PPR method and discuss its resent development to obtain the Hessian matrix…

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November 2017

Colloquium – Xiaoming Huo, Georgia Institute of Technology

November 10, 2017 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Title: Statistically and Numerically Efficient Independence Test The big data is a well-known phenomenon in the modern world. The emerging discipline of data science has inspired a lot of discussion and debate in the scientific research communities, including the mathematical and statistical science community. Contributing to this discussion, in the first part of this talk, I will present a discussion as well as a selective survey on the landscape of data science, as it is forming its foundation. On the…

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January 2018

Colloquium – John Etnyre, Georgia Institute of Technology

January 23, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Topic:  Curvature and contact topology Abstract:  Contact geometry is a beautiful subject that has important interactions with topology in dimension three. In this talk I will give a brief introduction to contact geometry and discuss its interactions with Riemannian geometry. In particular I will discuss a contact geometry analog of the famous sphere theorem and more generally indicate how the curvature of a Riemannian metric can influence properties of a contact structure adapted to it. This is joint work with…

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Algebra/Topology Seminar

January 29, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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February 2018

Algebra/Topology Seminar

February 5, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Algebra/Topology Seminar

February 12, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Algebra/Topology Seminar – Patricia Cahn (Smith College)

February 19, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Colored Tri-Plane Diagrams and the Slice-Ribbon Problem Abstract: We study dihedral branched covers of the four-dimensional sphere, where the branching set is a surface with one singularity modeled on the cone on a knot K.   We construct examples of these covers using colored tri-plane diagrams, which are triples of tangles that can be used to describe a surface in the four-sphere.  We also show that a knot invariant arises in this context, which can potentially be used to prove…

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Algebra/Topology Seminar

February 26, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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March 2018

Algebra/Topology Seminar

March 5, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Algebra/Topology Seminar

March 19, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Algebra/Topology Seminar

March 26, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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April 2018

Algebra/Topology Seminar

April 2, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Algebra/Topology Seminar

April 9, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Colloquium – Julie Mitchell (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

April 10, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

ABSTRACT flyer - Julie Mitchell

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Algebra/Topology Seminar

April 16, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Algebra/Topology Seminar

April 23, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Colloquium – Maria Laura delle Monache (Inria Grenoble – Rhône Alpes)

April 24, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Topic:  Control of traffic flow: from ramp metering to autonomous vehicles Abstract: In this talk, we will consider different control frameworks for traffic flow. In particular, we will show the evolution of traffic control from classical strategies (for example ramp-metering) to more modern approaches using autonomous vehicles. We will introduce different ways to describe mathematically the phenomenon by using scalar conservation laws and coupled PDE-ODE models, modeling traffic dynamics with a macroscopic approach and presenting different control techniques that could…

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August 2018

Applied Math Seminar, Oleksii Beznosov, University of Colorado Boulder

August 24, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Seminar Title: High order hybrid Hermite-discontinuous Galerkin overset grid methods for the wave equation

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Applied Math Seminar – Chuntian Wang, University of Alabama

August 31, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Initial and boundary value problems for the deterministic and stochastic Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation in a bounded domain

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September 2018

Applied Math Seminar – Dang Nguyen, University of Alabama

September 7, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: A Multi-scale Approach to  Limit Cycles with Random Perturbations Involving Fast Switching and Small Diffusion Abstract: This talk is devoted to multi-scale stochastic systems. The motivation is to treat limit cycles under random perturbations involving fast  random switching and small diffusion, which are represented by the use of two small parameters. Associated with the underlying systems, there are averaged or limit systems. Suppose that for each pair of the parameters, the solution of the corresponding equation has an invariant…

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Colloquium, William T. Trotter, Georgia Institute of Technology

September 11, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: The Top Ten Theorems in the Combinatorics of Posets

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Applied Math Seminar – Yichuan Zhao, Georgia State University

September 14, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Empirical likelihood for the bivariate survival function under univariate censoring Abstract: The bivariate survival function plays an important role in multivariate survival analysis. Using the idea of influence functions, we develop empirical likelihood confidence intervals for the bivariate survival function in the presence of univariate censoring. It is shown that the empirical log-likelihood ratio has an asymptotic standard chi-squared distribution with one degree of freedom. A comprehensive simulation study shows that the proposed method outperforms both the traditional normal…

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AWM Seminar – Elizabeth Peplinski, Alabama Insurance Society

September 17, 2018 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

The University of Alabama Chapter of the Association for Women in Mathematics is inviting you to attend Elizabeth Peplinski's talk on Actuary Science. Elizabeth Peplinski is the Acturial Chair of the  Alabama Insurance Society, a student organization for people interested in careers in the insurance industry. This will be a unique opportunity to learn about this great career field and get some insights on the recruitment process. This talk will take place on Monday, September 17, 2018 , from 3:00…

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Applied Math Seminar – Haomin Zhou, Georgia Institute of Technology

September 21, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 2:00 pm

Title: Optimal Transport on Finite Graphs with Applications Abstract: In this talk, I will discuss the optimal transport theory on discrete spaces. Various recent developments related to free energy, Fokker-Planck equations, as well as Wasserstein distance on graphs will be presented, some of them are rather surprising. Applications in game theory and robotics will be demonstrated. This presentation is based on several joint papers with Shui-Nee Chow (Georgia Tech), Wen Huang (USTC), Wuchen Li (UCLA), Yao Li (U. Mass), Jun…

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October 2018

Colloquium – Rodrigo Bañuelos, Purdue University

October 2, 2018 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title:  On the discrete Hilbert transform   Abstract:  The discrete Hilbert transform, acting on the space of (doubly infinite) sequences, was introduced by David Hilbert at the beginning of the 20th century. It is the discrete analogue of the continuous Hilbert transform acting on functions on the real line (conjugate function in the periodic case). In 1925, M. Riesz proved the Lp boundedness, for p larger than one and finite, of the continuous version, thereby solving a problem of considerable…

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January 2019

Applied Math Seminar – Shibin Dai, University of Alabama

January 18 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Mean field models for thin film droplet coarsening Abstract: A thin liquid film coating a solid substrate is unstable and the late stage morphology is essentially quasiequilibrium droplets connected by an ultra thin film. Droplets exchange mass and coarsening occurs — the total number of droplets N(t) decreases while the average size of droplets increases. It is predicted that N(t) obeys a power law $N(t) \sim ct^{-2/5}$ in the 1D case. For the physically realistic case when the underlying…

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Applied Math Seminar – Brendan Ames, University of Alabama

January 25 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Exact clustering by semidefinite programming under the heterogeneous planted cluster model. Abstract: Clustering, or the sorting of data into groups of similar items, is a fundamental task in machine learning and statistical analysis. Until recently, most computational methods for clustering relied on heuristics with no theoretical guarantee ensuring that clusters present in the data would be correctly identified. In this talk, I will present recent results partially addressing this issue. Specifically, I will discuss a new probabilistic model for…

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February 2019

Applied Math Seminar – Yuhui Chen, University of Alabama

February 1 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Bayesian Nonparametric Models and Its Applications Abstract: Polya tree priors are random probability measures that are easily centered at standard parametric families, such as the normal. As such, they provide a convenient avenue toward creating a parametric/nonparametric model for data. Briefly, we center a Polya tree at an initial parametric guess on data; then by adding more details via data, departures from the initial guess will be captured and used for adjusting the guess to obtain a robust nonparametric…

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Analysis Seminar – Christoph Fischbacher, University of Alabama at Birmingham

February 4 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Area Laws for the Entanglement in the XXZ spin chain Abstract: The question on how to rigorously define and prove Many-Body-Localization (MBL)  phenomena has attracted significant interest over the recent years. In this talk, we will give a physical motivation for the so-called entanglement entropy (EE) and explain why an area law for the EE can be interpreted as a sign of MBL. We then introduce the Heisenberg XXZ spin Hamiltonian, which is unitarily equivalent to a direct sum of discrete many-particle Schrödinger operators…

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Applied Math Seminar – Shibin Dai, University of Alabama

February 15 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Degenerate Diffusion in Phase Separations Abstract: Phase separations are widely observed phenomena in materials science. One model of phase separation is the Cahn-Hilliard equation with a smooth double-well potential, and with phase-dependent diffusion mobilities. The latter is a feature of many materials systems and makes the analysis and accurate numerical simulations challenging. In this talk I will discuss three aspects of the degenerate Cahn-Hilliard equations: 1. the sharp-interface limit via asymptotic analysis, and the dynamics in different time scales;…

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Research Talk – Xin Zhou, University of California, Santa Barbara

February 19 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Multiplicity One Conjecture in Min-max theory Abstract: I will present a recent proof of the Multiplicity One Conjecture in Min-max theory. This conjecture was raised by Marques and Neves as the key step to establish a Morse theory for the area functional. It says that in a closed manifold of dimension between 3 and 7 with a bumpy metric, the min-max minimal hypersurfaces associated with the volume spectrum introduced by Gromov, Guth, Marques-Neves are all two-sided and have multiplicity one. As…

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Analysis Seminar – Joe Renzi, University of Alabama

February 25 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Two-sided Mullins-Sekerka flow does not preserve convexity, after Uwe F. Mayer   Abstract: The (two-sided) Mullins-Sekerka model is a nonlocal evolution model for closed hypersurfaces, which was originally proposed as a model for phase transitions of materials of negligible specific heat. Under this evolution the propagating interfaces maintain the enclosed volume while the area of the interfaces decreases. We will show by means of an example that the Mullins-Sekerka flow does not preserve convexity in two space dimensions, where we consider…

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March 2019

Analysis Seminar – Tim Ferguson, University of Alabama

March 4 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Colloquium – Ken Ono, Emory University

March 5 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Topic:  Polya’s Program for the Riemann Hypothesis and Related Problems Abstract: In 1927 Polya proved that the Riemann Hypothesis is equivalent to the hyperbolicity of Jensen polynomials for Riemann’s Xi-function. This hyperbolicity has only been proved for degrees d=1, 2, 3. We prove the hyperbolicity of 100% of the Jensen polynomials of every degree. We obtain a general theorem which models such polynomials by Hermite polynomials. This theorem also allows us to prove a conjecture of Chen, Jia, and Wang…

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Colloquium – Karen Parshall, Commonwealth Professor of Mathematics and History, University of Virginia

March 19 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: The Roaring Twenties in American Mathematics Abstract:  World War I served as a break in business as usual within the American mathematical research community. In its aftermath, American mathematicians had the sense, in Oswald Veblen’s words, of entering into “a new era in the development of our science.”  To that end, “very nerve,” according to Roland Richardson, “should be strained to get our research back on its feet.” These and others poured themselves into their work in the 1920s,…

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Applied Math Seminar – Steven Wise, University of Tennessee

March 29 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Convergence Analyses of some Nonlinear Multi-Level Algorithms for Non-Quadratic Convex Optimization Problems via Space Decomposition and Subspace Correction Abstract: Nonlinear multi-level methods, such as the full approximation storage (FAS) multigrid scheme, are widely used solvers for nonlinear problems. In this presentation, a new framework to analyze FAS-type methods for convex optimization problems is developed. FAS can be recast as an inexact version of a nonlinear multigrid method based on space decomposition and subspace correction, namely the successive subspace optimization…

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April 2019

Analysis Seminar – Ryan Berndt, Otterbein University

April 1 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Two-weight problem for the Fourier transform. Abstract: We examine the problem of the Fourier transform mapping one weighted Lebesgue space into another, by studying necessary conditions and sufficient conditions which expose an underlying geometry. In the necessary conditions, this geometry is connected to an old result of Mahler concerning the the measure of a convex body and its geometric polar being essentially reciprocal. An additional assumption, that the weights must belong to a reverse Hölder class, is used to…

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Analysis Seminar – Khalid Said, University of Alabama

April 8 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Colloquium – Mark Behrens, University of Notre Dame

April 9 @ 11:00 am - 1:00 pm

Title: "Current themes in the study of the  homotopy groups of spheres" Abstract: I will summarize the current state of affairs of the study of the stable homotopy groups of spheres, and will describe some connections to algebraic and differential geometry.

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Applied Math Seminar – Rongjie Lai, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

April 12 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Understanding Manifold-structured Data via Geometric Modeling and Learning Abstract: Analyzing and inferring the underlying global intrinsic structures of data from its local information are critical in many fields. In practice, coherent structures of data allow us to model data as low dimensional manifolds, represented as point clouds, in a possible high dimensional space. Different from image and signal processing which handle functions on flat domains with well-developed tools for processing and learning, manifold-structured data sets are far more challenging…

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Applied Math Seminar – Trang Dinh, University of Alabama

April 19 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Understanding Tensor and Tensor Decompositions Abstract: Tensors are multidimensional arrays that can play a key role in the representation of big data. Decompositions of higher-order tensors have applications in biochemistry, signal processing, data mining, neuroscience, and elsewhere. The talk will present commonly used tensor operations and different types of tensor decomposition. Specifically, it will illustrate the CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP) decomposition and the Tucker decomposition, which are examples of decompositions that have been employed to optimize the storage of large high-order…

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Colloquium – Xiaofan Li, Illinois Institute of Technology

April 23 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Numerical simulations of macroscopic quantities for stochastic differential equations with alpha-stable processes Abstract: The mean first exit time, escape probability and transitional probability density are utilized to quantify dynamical behaviors of stochastic differential equations with non-Gaussian, $\alpha$-stable type L\'evy motions. Taking advantage of the Toeplitz matrix structure of the time-space discretization, a fast and accurate numerical algorithm is proposed to simulate the nonlocal Fokker-Planck equations on either a bounded or infinite domain. Under a specified condition, the scheme is…

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Applied Math Seminar – Dengfeng Sun, Purdue University

April 26 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Improving the Convergence Rate of the Distributed Gradient Descent Method Abstract: This talk presents our recent work on the accelerated Distributed Gradient Descent (DGD) method for distributed optimization problems. We observed that the inexact convergence of the DGD algorithm can be caused by the inaccuracy in the consensus procedure in a distributed optimization setting. Motivated by this observation, we try to develop a sufficiently accurate consensus method in order for a better convergence result. In our work, it is…

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Analysis Seminar – Khalid Said, University of Alabama

April 29 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Abstract In this presentation we examine some useful properties of the numerical range. We explore two dierent positions , generic and generalized generic positions. We show that two pairs of subspaces (M,N) and (M?;N?) are unitarily equivalent if M and N are subspaces of Cn in generic position by constructing a unitary operator. We establish the relationships between two sets of the principal angles, the principal angles between M and N and the principal angles between M? and N?. We…

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September 2019

AWM General Body Meeting

September 4 @ 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
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Applied Math Seminar – Duy Nguyen (Marist College)

September 13 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title : Nonparametric density estimation by B-spline duality Abstract: In this talk, we propose a new nonparametric density estimator derived from the theory of frames and Riesz bases. In particular, we propose the so-called bi-orthogonal density estimator based on the class of B-splines and derive its theoretical properties, including the asymptotically optimal choice of bandwidth. Detailed theoretical analysis and comparisons of our estimator with existing local basis and kernel density estimators are presented. The estimator is particularly well suited for…

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Analysis Seminar – Simon Bortz (University of Washington)

September 13 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Title: Sobolev contractivity of the gradient flow maximal function Abstract:  In 2013, Carneiro and Svaiter showed that the heat flow maximal function is contractive in $\dot{W}^{1,2}(\mathbb{R}^n)$ for $W^{1,2}(\mathbb{R}^n)$ functions. In other words, if $K_t$ is the heat kernel then $u_*(x) = \sup_{t > 0} (K_t \ast |f|)(x)$ for some $f \in W^{1,2}(\mathbb{R}^n)$ then $\|\nabla u_*\|_{L^2(\mathbb{R}^n)} \le \|\nabla f\|_{L^2(\mathbb{R}^n)}$. Equivalently, one can define $u_*$ by solving the Cauchy (initial value) problem for the heat equation, $\partial_t u - \Delta u =…

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Applied Math Seminar – Sergei V. Gleyzer, University of Alabama

September 20 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: The Interplay between Deep Learning and Physics Abstract: In my talk, I will discuss the interplay of deep learning and physics. I will focus on both foundational and applied topics, including examples of machine learning applications in high-energy physics. I will discuss interpretability, learning methodology, end-to-end learning, incorporation of physical laws in model building and finally, discuss the connection between physics and deep learning theory.

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Analysis Seminar – David Cruz-Uribe (University of Alabama)

September 20 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Title: Matrix Ap weights, degenerate Sobolev spaces, and mappings of finite distortion of finite distortion.

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Colloquium – Jianlin Xia (Purdue University)

September 24 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Topic:  Fast Solutions of Large Linear Systems and Eigenvalue Problems by Exploring Structures Abstract: Solving large linear systems and eigenvalue problems remains to be the key computational tasks in scientific computing, data processing, and engineering simulations. Practical numerical problems often introduce various structures into the matrix representations. In this talk, we show the existence of certain hidden rank structures in some linear systems and eigenvalue problems and discuss how to explore the structures to design efficient solvers. Such structures often…

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Applied Math Seminar – Aaron Yip, Purdue University

September 27 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Dynamics on Inhomogeneous Medium Abstract: By means of two examples: (i) an ODE for the dynamics of a particle and (ii) a PDE for the motion by mean curvature of a surface, I will discuss some results, questions and recent attempts in the study of dynamical equations in inhomogeneous environment.

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Analysis Seminar – Kabe Moen (University of Alabama)

September 27 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Title: Connections between commutators and weighted inequalities Abstract: I will cover the Cauchy integral approach to the boundedness of commutators of Calderon-Zygmund operators and BMO functions.  I spoke about this approach and proved the basic commutator theorem of Coifman-Rochberg-Weiss in the fall of 2017.  In this talk I will go over some powerful extensions and a new converse to the theorem.

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October 2019

Analysis Seminar – Chenchen Mou, UCLA

October 4 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Title: Weak Solutions of Mean Field Game Master Equations. Abstract: In this talk we study master equations arising from mean field game problems, under the crucial monotonicity conditions. Classical solutions of such equations require very strong technical conditions. Moreover, unlike the master equations arising from mean field control problems, the mean field game master equations are non-local and even classical solutions typically do not satisfy the comparison principle, so the standard viscosity solution approach seems infeasible. We shall propose a notion…

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Colloquium in Honor of Hispanic Heritage Month – Ivelisse Rubio, University of Puerto Rico

October 8 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title:  The covering method: an intuitive approach to the computation of p-divisibility of exponential sums   Abstract:  Exponential sums over finite fields are an important tool for solving mathematical problems and have applications to many other areas. However, some of the methods and proofs of the results are non-elementary.  The main purpose of this talk is to present the covering method, an elementary and intuitive way to estimate or compute the p-divisibility of exponential sums, which is particularly convenient in…

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Applied Math Seminar – Wenrui Hao, Penn State University

October 11 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Homotopy Methods for Solving Nonlinear Systems and Beyond Abstract: This talk will cover some recent progress on homotopy methods to solve nonlinear systems. I will start with homotopy methods for solving nonlinear PDEs with multiple solutions and bifurcations by coupling with domain decomposition and reduced basis methods. Examples from hyperbolic systems and free boundary problems will be used to demonstrate the ideas. Then a homotopy method will be introduced for solving maximum entropy problem to reconstruct probability density functions…

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Analysis Seminar – Chang Yu, University of Florida

October 11 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Title: Global solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations Abstract : In this talk, I will talk about the existence of global weak solutions for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, in particular, the viscosity coefficients depend on the density. Our main contribution is to further develop renormalized techniques so that the Mellet-Vasseur type inequality is not necessary for the compactness.  This provides existence of global solutions in time, for the barotropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations, for any $\gamma>1$, in three dimensional space, with large…

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Colloquium – Xiaobing Feng, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

October 15 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Phase field method for geometric moving interface problems and their numerical approximations Abstract:  In this talk I shall first give a brief introduction to the phase field method for general geometric moving interface problems. The focus will be on presenting its idea, formulation,and relationship to other methods for moving interface problems such as the level set method.The second part of the talk will devote to discussing some latest advances in developing efficient numerical methods for solving phase field models.…

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Analysis Seminar – Tim Ferguson (University of Alabama)

October 18 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Title: Bergman and Szego projections, Extremal Problems, and Square Functions Abstract: We study estimates for Hardy space norms of analytic projections. We first find a sufficient condition for the Bergman projection of a function in the unit disc to belong to the Hardy space $H^p$ for $1 < p < \infty$. We apply the result to prove a converse to an extension of Ryabykh's theorem about Hardy space regularity for Bergman space extremal functions. We also prove that the $H^q$ norm of…

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Analysis Seminar – Yuanzhen Shao (University of Alabama

October 25 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Title: The Fractional Porous Medium Equation on Manifolds with Conic Singularities Abstract: Due to the need to model long range diffusive interaction, during the last decade there has been a growing interest in considering diffusion equations involving non-local operators, e.g. the fractional powers of differential operators. In this talk, I will report some recent work with Nikolaos Roidos on the fractional porous medium equation on manifolds with cone-like singularities. I will show that most of the properties of the usual…

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November 2019

Colloquium – Changyou Wang (Purdue University)

November 5 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Combinatorial graph of DNA self-assembly.

Title: Analysis of hydrodynamics of nematic liquid crystals Abstract: The orientation of Liquid crystal molecules has their preferable direction and exhibits an optical structure. Liquid crystal can also been viewed as an intermediate state between the liquid and the solid states. Given the importance, people have studied liquid crystals from the view point of modeling, computation, analysis, and engineering. In this talk, I will focus on the hydrodynamics of nematic liquid crystals, namely the Ericksen-Leslie system in conjunction with the (static) Oseen-Frank theory. The governing equation can…

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Applied Math Seminar – Yajun Mei (Georgia Tech)

November 8 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title: Bandit change-point detection and its application Abstract: We investigate the problem of bandit change-point problem when monitoring high-dimensional streaming data in resources constrained environments, where one has limited capacity in data acquisition, transmission or processing, and needs decide how to smartly observe which local components or features of high-dimensional streaming data at each and every time so as to detect changes quickly. In the first part of this talk, we provide an overview of the classical sequential change-point detection…

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Analysis Seminar – Xuan Wang (University of Alabama)

November 8 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Title: Harmonic Conjugation in Variable Exponent Harmonic Bergman Spaces Abstract: I will talk about the harmonic conjugation in variable harmonic Bergman space. In the first part of the talk, I'll provide an overview of the main result for constant exponent spaces.  Then I'll illustrate our latest research on the boundedness of harmonic conjugation in variable harmonic Bergman space.

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Colloquium: Jo Ellis-Monaghan (Saint Michael’s College)

November 12 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Title:  Combinatorial, topological, and computational approaches to DNA self-assembly. Abstract: Applications of immediate concern have driven some of the most interesting questions in the field of graph theory, for example graph drawing and computer chip layout problems, random graph theory and modeling the internet, graph connectivity measures and ecological systems, etc.  Currently, scientists are engineering self-assembling DNA molecules to serve emergent applications in biomolecular computing, nanoelectronics, biosensors, drug delivery systems, and organic synthesis.  Often, the self-assembled objects, e.g. lattices or…

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Applied Math Seminar – Karl Glasner (University of Arizona)

November 15 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Mathematical Aspects of Nanoscale Self-Assembly Self-assembly is a fundamental process for creation of both biological and synthetic materials. The latter are being employed in important biotechnological applications like drug delivery, as well as forming the basis for molecular sized machines. Recent advances in nanoscale fabrication in polymer systems, in particular, has lead to growing interest in the theoretical aspects of self-assembly. This talk introduces continuum formulations of inhomogeneous polymer systems, which lead to questions in the calculus of variations and…

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Analysis Seminar – Scott Rodney, Cape Breton University

November 15 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Title: Regularity Estimates for PDE with Data in Non-Standard Spaces Abstract: In this talk I present recent joint work with D. Cruz-Uribe. Given a weak super-solution $u\in W^{1,2}_0(\Omega)$ of the elliptic equation $$-\textrm{Div}\left(Q(x)\nabla u(x) \right) = f(x)$$ in a smooth domain $\Omega$ of $\mathbb{R}^n$ with $f$ in the Birnbaum-Orlicz space $L^A(\Omega)$ ($A(t) = t^{n/2}\log^\sigma(e+t)$ with $\sigma>n/2$) we show that $u$ satisfies$$\|u\|_{L^\infty(\Omega)} \leq C\|f\|_{L^A(\Omega)}$$with $C$ independent of both $u$ and $f$.  This talk will discuss many basic notions in the theory…

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Analysis Seminar – Joshua Isralowitz (SUNY Albany)

November 22 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Title: Sparse domination of commutators via matrix techniques Abstract: In this talk, we will show how one can obtain sparse domination of iterated commutators from a convex body domination of an operator via a simple algebraic trick.  Time permitting, we discuss consequences and related results, such as a bumped Orlicz BMO type sufficient condition for the two weight boundedness of iterated commutators with a CZO and a related umbumped necessary two weight bound for Riesz transforms (both with arbitrary, not necessarily Ap,…

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